A man from Leeds has been jailed over his part in a violent rally by the English Defence League.

Gareth Wall, 25, of Moresdale Lane, Seacroft, used a metal pole to smash the window of a restaurant as thugs caused damage in the Regency Wharf area of Birmingham.

He was jailed for 20 months after judge Richard Bond told him he had shown no remorse for his “persistent” offending, which included kicking out at a police dog while goading the animal using a St George’s Cross flag.

The sentencing of eight EDL supporters for violent disorder had earlier been temporarily halted after one of them demanded to be updated on the Sydney cafe siege.

Judge Bond briefly adjourned the case after being verbally abused, urged to “pass proper sentences” on Islamic extremists, and asked: “Any news on the Australian hostages?”

After returning to court, he sentenced the men, aged 22 to 35, to sentences of between 14 months and two years.

During the EDL rally, in July last year, a Muslim prayer cap and a Pakistani flag were set on fire and police were pelted with paving slabs and bottles.

Yorkshire Evening Post

A Swindon man involved in a violent riot against police by the English Defence League has been jailed – but received a shorter sentence than the others because he has since quit the controversial far right group.

Thomas Flynn confronted police officers and forced them to push him away with riot shields during the disorder when EDL supporters from all over the country descended on Birmingham for a protest march through the city centre.

Sentencing of the eight men convicted of violent disorder was temporarily halted after one of them demanded to be updated on the Sydney café siege.

The judge, Richard Bond, adjourned the case after being verbally abused, urged to “pass proper sentences” on Islamic extremists, and asked: “Any news on the Australian hostages?”

Some of the defendants walked around the dock at Birmingham Crown Court during the outbursts, which also included chants of “No surrender to the Taliban.”

Judge Bond had already sentenced three of the men when one of them shouted “If there were proper sentences for extremists, the EDL wouldn’t be here” and another asked for news of events in Australia.

The judge then left the court-room for several minutes, before returning to continue to address the defendants and explain their sentences.

Jailing others for 18 months or two years, he gave Flynn, a 22-year-old from Grange Drive in Swindon, just 14 months after hearing that he now helped out at a respite centre and had since disassociated himself from the EDL.

Among the others in the dock over violent scenes at an EDL rally in Birmingham city centre was Otis Bloodworth, who attended the protest event in July 2013 wearing Union Jack boxing gloves and shorts.

CCTV footage played to the court showed Bloodworth, of Drummond Road, Skegness, Lincolnshire, punching a man who was being led away from the event by stewards.

The 35-year-old, who has 43 previous convictions dating back to 1997, was arrested and taken to a police station in March after an appeal for information on the BBC’s Crimewatch programme.

When questioned by officers as to whether he had any medical conditions, Bloodworth said he had ‘Islamophobia’ and refused to be represented by a Muslim solicitor.

Bloodworth was jailed for 18 months alongside Benjamin Crowder, who was celebrating his 21st birthday at the protest march.

Crowder, now 22, of Lumsdale Crescent, Matlock, Derbyshire, was given a two-year custodial sentence after footage was played to the court of him throwing an object at police.

Shane Williams, 27, of Birds Nest Avenue, Leicester, was jailed for two years. The court heard that he was seen chanting anti-Islamic slogans, hurled an empty soft drinks bottle at police, and was present at five of seven distinct sites of disorder at the protest.

Another defendant, Gareth Wall, 25, of Moresdale Lane, Leeds, used a metal pole to smash the window of a restaurant as thugs caused damage in the Regency Wharf area of Birmingham. He was jailed for 20 months after the judge told him he had shown no remorse for his “persistent” offending, which included kicking out at a police dog while goading the animal using a St George’s Cross flag.

During the EDL rally, a Muslim prayer cap and a Pakistani flag were set on fire in the street, while police were pelted with paving slabs and bottles. Around 200 EDL supporters were involved in the violence in the Broad Street and Centenary Square areas of Birmingham, which lasted for around two hours and left 30 officers injured.

Western Daily Press

Clockwise from top left: Ashley Rowland, James Cocks, Melvyn Parker and Jason Harris were sentenced on Friday over violence during last year's EDL protest

Clockwise from top left: Ashley Rowland, James Cocks, Melvyn Parker and Jason Harris were sentenced on Friday over violence during last year’s EDL protest

AN English Defence League supporter who hurled a fire extinguisher at police officers at “almost point blank range” as violence flared in Birmingham has been jailed.

Ashley Rowland was among up to 300 people involved in bloody clashes with police during a demonstration in the city centre on July 20 last year.

Thirty officers were injured with one needing hospital treatment.

Judge Richard Bond said Rowland was the most heavily-involved of more than 50 defendants due to be sentenced over the violence and had moved between various pockets of trouble.

He chanted racial and anti-religious slogans with others and aggressively confronted officers in Centenary Square.

And Rowland tried to scale a wall outside the International Convention Centre and threw a plank of wood which hit a police officer after he and other demonstrators raided a building site.

Outside the Hyatt Hotel, he picked up three pieces of a metal hotel sign which he also threw at a police cordon, Birmingham Crown Court heard.

At one point four officers became trapped on Broad Street and were surrounded.

Judge Bond told Rowland: “You picked up a fire extinguisher and forcefully threw it at the trapped officers.”

Rowland, 25, of Mexborough, South Yorkshire, had previously admitted a charge of violent disorder and was jailed for 31 months.

Three others were also sentenced for their roles in the trouble today.

Melvyn Parker, 47, of Mansfield, and James Cocks, 35, of Binton Close, Redditch, were both sentenced to two years while Jason Harris, 40, of Eccles, Salford, was jailed for 20 months.

James Cocks was sentenced to two years

James Cocks was sentenced to two years

They had also pleaded guilty to violent disorder.

Passing sentence, the judge said the atmosphere before the 2,000-strong demonstration was “highly charged” following the murder of soldier Lee Rigby on a street in London.

The trouble lasted for around two hours and broke out at seven sites as EDL supporters tried to break through a police cordon and reach counter-demonstrators.

The worst violence was in Centenary Square where missiles were thrown, officers were kicked and punched and portable toilets were used as weapons.

Gerry Bermingham, for Rowland, said he had set up a small business since the incident and was trying to rehabilitate himself.

Nigel Stelling, for Parker, said he was “out of control” with drink and drugs when he joined the EDL.

A total of eight men have now been jailed for their roles in the violence.

Yesterday, four other defendants were jailed for a total of more than six years for their parts.

Birmingham Mail

EDL-Four

A English Defence League supporter from the West Midlands involved in clashes with police while on crutches at a protest rally has been jailed for 16 months.

Lee Joshua claimed to have “enjoyed every minute” of violent scenes which left 30 police officers injured, and later posted an image of himself burning a copy of the Koran on Facebook.

Birmingham Crown Court heard that a Muslim prayer cap and a Pakistani flag were set on fire in the street, while police were pelted with paving slabs and bottles during the disorder in July 2013.

Around 200 EDL supporters were involved in the violence in the Broad Street and Centenary Square areas of Birmingham, which lasted for around two hours.

Joshua, said to have been at the fore-front of attempts to break through police lines, was sentenced alongside fellow EDL supporters Jake Hill, James Harrington and Adam Beebee.

Passing sentence on the men, who all admitted violent disorder, Judge Richard Bond said much of the conduct seen at the EDL rally had been “plainly racist and/or anti-Muslim”.

The judge told them: “There were seven separate sites where violence was either used of threatened.

“Even officers trained for public disorder and who have experience of such situations told both juries (in earlier trials) how scared they were of what was taking place.

“They had not seen aggression like this before despite their experience.”

Commenting on CCTV footage which showed police trying to stop EDL supporters from forcing their way into a building site, the judge added: “The only sensible option for the officers was to use their batons.”

The court heard that Hill, 22, of Mill Street, Brierley Hill, West Midlands, attempted to push a policeman, spat in the direction of another in a “deeply unpleasant” act, and was part of a crowd which attacked four officers trapped between two vans.

Police watch over a crowd on the day of the protest

Police watch over a crowd on the day of the protest

Hill, who was jailed 22 months, was told by the judge that his involvement in the disorder had been persistent and prolonged.

Harrington, a former bricklayer and grave-digger from Swarcliffe Road, Leeds, attended the rally wearing a One True Saxon T-shirt.

The 30-year-old father-of-two, who was jailed for two years, was seen on CCTV standing on top of a fast food kiosk holding a half-full bottle of brandy.

He later tried to hit a police officer using a placard on a length of wood, but was knocked off balance by a surge in the crowd.

Racist text message were found on Harrington’s phone after his arrest, showing that he was “looking for trouble” even before he arrived in Birmingham.

Beebee, 28, of Boundary Road, Erdington, Birmingham, was involved in two separate incidents of disorder and admitted trying to pass through police lines to “have a ruck” with counter-protesters.

The 28-year-old, who works for Jaguar Land Rover and gave himself up after a televised appeal for information, was sentenced to 13 months’ imprisonment.

Joshua, of Highbridge Road, Netherton, near Dudley, West Midlands, was seen pushing and shoving and being held back by EDL stewards.

After ending up with a large cut on his head, which the judge said was probably caused by a police baton, Joshua shouted “You lot done this” at officers.

The 43-year-old, who told police he had consumed 10 cans of lager, later posted a message on Facebook claiming the Koran was an “evil” book and showing a copy of it being burnt.

Judge Bond was told that Joshua had previously served eight custodial sentences after amassing a total of 89 previous convictions.

A further 48 men are due to be sentenced during December at the same court for offences linked to the disorder.


Express & Star

Jake Hill has a previous conviction for affray at an EDL demo in 2011. Details here.

Angry about the Islamic State mass murders and beheadings he had seen in the news, a man took out his fury on an Islamic Community Centre at Carnon Downs, sending grossly offensive cards there which he had smeared with his dog’s faeces.

One of the pictures showed Allah having intercourse with a pig, and another, a naked woman sitting on an Islamic State flag, both containing offensive messages.

The sender, 60-year-old Eric King, of Wheal Eliza Close, St Austell, who was said to have a bad heart and needed to walk with a stick, pleaded guilty to sending an indecent or grossly offensive letter to Tipu Choudhury at the Cornwall Islamic Community Centre and sending two indecent or grossly offensive messages on Facebook.

Alison May, for the CPS, said Mr Choudhury was the general secretary at the community centre in Carnon Downs where there was a designated Muslim prayer area. He received an envelope in the post containing two cards with pictures on them and offensive messages, and smelling of excrement.

One of the messages on Facebook claimed it was sacrilege for the centre to have replaced the former Christian church which was there with what he described as the evil of the Muslim religion, saying: “Get out of the country”.

When he was seen by the police, King said: “There will be a war soon”. He said he did not like anything to do with Islam and saw Facebook as a mechanism for him to have a voice. “They can preach against us, why not us against them?” He had a previous conviction for assaulting a police officer and for harassment.

His solicitor Paul Gallagher said King had always been a Christian and other religions did not bother him unless they crossed the line and preached hatred against Christianity, and that was what he felt Islam was doing.

“He considered turning a house of God, the old chapel, into a Muslim centre, was sacrilege,” said Mr Gallagher.

He had begun to get angry about it and already suffered from anger issues for which he was now taking medication.

Mr Gallagher referred to Islamic mass murders and beheadings, which he said made King angry.

“He got so worked up about what was happening he decided to send the pictures to the Islam centre. He took the photographs from a Facebook picture and went to a local store and had them printed off, and then wiped them with dog excrement and sent them. He was particularly angry and upset at what he was seeing in newspapers and on the television.”

Mr Gallagher said what King did would not be repeated. He would continue with his own Facebook page to give himself a voice.

The magistrates adjourned the case to December 16 for a full probation report, giving King bail with conditions not to use any social networking site to pass any abusive, threatening or insulting messages, not to contact any person associated with the community centre and not to attend the centre.

This Is West Country

From his Facebook page:-

Eric King 1

Eric King

Eric king 2

A man posted on Facebook he hoped missing toddler Mikaeel Kular was found “under the wheels of a bus”.

Shaun Moth posted a series of offensive posts on a group on the social networking website the day before the toddler’s body was found in woodland in Kirkcaldy.

The 45-year-old, from Whitehills, Aberdeenshire, pleaded guilty to conducting himself in a disorderly manner, posting grossly offensive comments on Facebook and breach of the peace aggravated by religious prejuidice at Aberdeen Sheriff Court on Thursday.

Fiscal depute David Bernard said: “On the 16th of January this year Mikaeel Kular, who at the time was aged three, was reported missing by his mother in the Edinburgh area.

“A national media release was sent by Police Scotland to try to trace the child.

“On that date a post was put on the page for a group entitled Scotland United Against the racist SDL.

“During the evening of the 16th of January, one of the administrators for that Facebook page logged on to the page and that account to view recent activity.

“At this time she noticed a comment about the missing child which was made at 1745 hours that day by a user named Shaun Moth.

“The comment read ‘Hopefully he’ll be found… under the wheels of a bus’.”

Several other comments were posted on Facebook by Moth and the administrator was “so offended” she decided to hide them from public view.

Among them was a statement from Moth that he would laugh when the child’s body was found.

Another post read: “I care not. One less ethnic regardless of his age is a good thing. Said what I wanted to and annoyed a few of your ilk. My work is done here. wpww 14/88.”

Mr Bernard said the acronym wpww was understood to stand for White Power World Wide and 14/88 was a Neo-Nazi term for “Heil Hitler”.

Moth also posted the comment: “Do you look for missing white kids as well?” on the page and called for another account user to concentrate on getting “that Arab loving ape” out of the White House.

The court heard Moth also posted a comment about Jews on the page.

The Facebook administrator contacted police and officers carried out a search of Moth’s home on January 29.

During his police interview, he described himself as a Nationalist Socialist, told officers he often went on to the Facebook page for debate and classed it as a left wing Marxist page for all Communist types.

Moth was asked if he was racist and said he was an intelligent man and “not a mindless yob”.

He said in the interview: “My heritage is being stripped by these people. It’s being systematically eroded and attacked by these people”.

Sheriff William Summers remanded him in custody to be sentenced at a later date.

Police said the case should serve as a reminder to people that they would be brought to court if they posted offensive material online.

Chief Inspector John McCluskey said: “This case is another example of Police Scotland’s commitment to pursue those who cause offence and distress to others on social media.

“People need to remember that they cannot hide behind social media and that if they make vile offensive comments online they will be prosecuted.”

STV

From his Youtube account:-

Shaun Moth

Gareth Devlin

An EDL supporter has been jailed for five years today after being found guilty of attacking a man with a samurai sword.

Gareth Devlin from Port Clarence, Teeside attacked a group of Polish nationals who were watching the World Cup in July. During the attack, Devlin threatened to kill all Polish people.

The horrific attack was caught on camera by an amateur photographer who handed the evidence to police.

The Teeside racist can be seen waving the sword at the group of Poles which sadly included a group of children.

He then attacked one of the men causing a wound to the man’s back that required five stiches.

Devlin,28 admitted wounding with intent, affray and possession of an offensive weapon.

Another man, Joseph Smithson also admitted affray. He was given a two-year community order with 120 hours’ unpaid work and a year’s supervision.

Gareth Devlin is no stranger to crime, having 40 previous offences on his lengthy criminal record, including four for violence.He was sent to a young offenders’ institution in 2007 for having a home-made machete in a public place.

Hope not Hate

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