North west Infidels member Shane Calvert jailed after violent scenes

diddy-4

One of the suspected ringleaders of the violent North West Infidels rally at St George’s Hall has been jailed over another ugly far-right demo in Dover weeks earlier.

Shane Calvert, a prominent member of the Infidels, was jailed for two and a half years for violent disorder after the bloody scenes on the South Coast.

Calvert, 34, of Shadsworth Close in Blackburn, Lancashire, rallied supporters to take part in the march through Dover.

Five people were injured when rival groups clashed during the Dover rally, organised by right wing protesters, on January 30.

Smoke bombs were let off and bricks hurled as hundreds of far-right demonstrators were met by anti-fascist groups.

The trouble came just four weeks before hate-filled trouble in Liverpool city centre saw smoke bombs, bricks and bottles hurled into crowds.

Ugly scenes erupted as the North West Infidels clashed with anti-fascist protesters on the steps of St George’s Hall in February.

A police officer was treated in hospital for concussion, far-right symbols were daubed on the Grade I-listed building and student Abbie James, 21, had part of her skull scraped away after being hit by a missile .

Speaking after Calvert’s trial A Kent Police spokesman said: “Calvert was filmed throwing debris, pushing against the police cordon and standing on a police vehicle during the disturbance.

“He was arrested at his home address on Monday, March 7 but denied a charge of violent disorder. A trial was held at Canterbury Crown Court and a jury returned a guilty verdict on Thursday, September 22″.

Detective Inspector Bill Thornton said: ‘While everyone involved in the violence was responsible for their own actions, Shane Calvert played a big part in bringing groups of troublemakers together in one place.

‘He has considerable influence over those who share his political views and has a lot to answer for following the wholly unacceptable behaviour witnessed in Dover last January.”

Calvert was previously jailed for being one of six right-wing activists who stormed an anti-fascist meeting in Liverpool’s Bold Street and launched into a tirade of violence.

He received a 14-month jail term after pleading guilty to violent disorder for the attack which spilled into Cafe Tabac.

The 34-year-old, known within extremist circles as ‘Diddyman’, wrote on the far-right group’s Facebook page about the Liverpool clashes on February 27: “We held St George’s Hall for over four hours.

“Or anyway we stood on the steps. We held the steps!

“Not anyone can hold steps, but we did. Our Polish Nazi brothers held some steps too.

“The police looked after us while we did it, so we threw rocks at them. Get f****** used to it.”

Calvert, who has prominent links to Merseyside and sympathisers within the city, added: “To all that stood by us – We Salute You, Nazi style.

“For all that oppose us – you just try holding some steps.”

Liverpool Echo

diddy

A man from Lancashire who played a key role in organising the Dover protests has been jailed for two-and-a-half years for violent disorder.

Shane Calvert, 34, of Shadsworth Close in Blackburn, rallied supporters to take part in a march through the town on Saturday, January 30.

A counter-protest was held at the same time and both sides quickly engaged in violence towards one another.

Calvert was filmed throwing debris, pushing against the police cordon and standing on a police vehicle during the disturbance.

He was arrested at his home address on Monday, March 7 but denied a charge of violent disorder.

A jury at Canterbury Crown Court returned a guilty verdict on Thursday, September 22.

Detective inspector Bill Thornton said: “While everyone involved in the violence was responsible for their own actions, Shane Calvert played a big part in bringing groups of troublemakers together in one place.

“He has considerable influence over those who share his political views and has a lot to answer for following the wholly unacceptable behaviour witnessed in Dover last January.

“I am very pleased the courts have recognised this and imposed a lengthy prison sentence on Calvert, ensuring he will no longer be able to stir up trouble and bring further harm to other communities throughout the UK.

“The investigation into offences committed on the day continues and I am confident there will be many more positive outcomes for the people of Dover.”
Kent News

A court heard Kieron Wright posted a message on a public forum complaining about being moved to a different ward and making vile comments about a female nurse

Kieron Wright, 23, from Sunderland, who posted vile racist slurs about his nurse on Facebook

Kieron Wright, 23, from Sunderland, who posted vile racist slurs about his nurse on Facebook

A patient posted shocking racist abuse on Facebook about a nurse who was looking after him following an overdose.

Kieron Wright had been admitted to Sunderland Royal Hospital after taking an overdose, the Chronicle Live reports .

A court heard he posted a message on a public forum complaining about being moved to a different ward and making vile comments about a female nurse.

He referred to her as a “big ape-looking lass” and added: “Not ******* happy.

“If anyone was thinking about popping in with fruit, leave the bananas in the house, I don’t fancy getting robbed. Ha.”

Newcastle Crown Court heard a member of staff at Sunderland NHS Trust spotted the “gross racial slur” and contacted police.
NNP Kieron Wright, 23, from Sunderland, who posted vile racist slurs about his nurse on Faceboo
Wright had overdosed and was being treated

Now Wright, who said he was sorry and wasn’t thinking straight due to his overdose, has been spared jail after he admitted sending an offensive communication.

Mr Recorder Morris told the 23-year-old: “That was a deeply offensive message to post on a public forum.

“I have no doubt anyone who read it would have been disgusted by what they saw. Such language is entirely unacceptable.

“This was not just a message sent to one individual but was widely disseminated to the public.

“It was plainly a racially motivated offensive message and that is a serious aggravating factor in this case.”

Wright had ended up in hospital on the evening of March 10 this year.

The deputy head of corporate affairs at the local NHS Trust became aware of what he had written on Facebook during his stay.

Wright was interviewed by police and said he didn’t realise it would offend anyone and was sorry.

Alec Burns, defending, said: “He is very sorry about the communication offence.

“He couldn’t see it at the time but she was helping him. He didn’t understand at the time because of the state he was in. He apologises.”

Wright, of Rosedale Street, Sunderland, pleaded guilty to sending an offensive communication.

The court heard his 47 previous convictions include daubing graffiti on the walls of a police cell calling a man with an Asian-sounding name a “nonce”.

Wright also admitted assaulting a man in an unrelated offence because he wasn’t happy with the quality of cannabis he had been sold.

He had also failed to comply with a previous community order.

For the racist Facebook post and the assault, Wright was sentenced to a community order for 18 months, with rehabilitation and supervision requirements.

He was also given a restraining order to keep him away from the assault victim and his girlfriend.

Mr Burns said Wright has a history of mental health problems but has recently started working.

Newcastle Chronicle

kieron-w

A patient was arrested and prosecuted after he sent a racist Facebook post about his nurse from his hospital bed.

Kieron Wright, 23, said that the NHS worker looking after him at Sunderland Royal Hospital was “ape looking” and warned visitors not to bring him bananas in case she robbed them from him.

The shocking post on the social networking site was seen by the NHS trust bosses who reported it to the police.

Demolition worker Wright, of Rosedale Street, Sunderland, was arrested and admitted sending an offensive communication.

Newcastle Crown Court heard the post was put on Facebook on March 10.

It read: “Been moved ward again. Now on ward B26 and I’ve got a big, ape-looking lass for a nurse. Not happy one bit. If any of you are thinking about popping up with fruit etc, leave the bananas in the house, I don’t fancy getting robbed haha.”

Prosecutor Anne Richardson told the court the “extreme language” amounted to a “racial hate crime” which caused disgust to the hospital manager who saw it.

Wright was arrested and said he had not intended to cause any offense and was sorry if he had.

Mr Recorder Stephen Morris QC told Wright: “You realise, at the time, the nurse was in fact helping you.

“That was a deeply offensive message to post on a public forum.

“I have no doubt anyone who read it would have been disgusted by what they saw.

“Such language is entirely unacceptable.

“I do not accept you didn’t realise how offensive the message was but I accept you have apologised and shown remorse.

“This was not a post sent to one individual, it was widely disseminated to members of the public. It was a racially motivated offensive message committed against someone working in the public sector, nursing staff at a public hospital, which is also an aggravating feature.”

A spokeswoman for the trust told the Echo that the NHS bosses ‘will not hesitate’ in reporting such incidents and supporting their staff members.

Wright, who has previous convictions for violence and disorder, was before the judge for the Communications Act offence and an assault by beating, which he was convicted of after a trial.

The violence related to him punching a man at his home when he went to complain about the quality of the cannabis he had bought from him.

Wright, who has been on a curfew for around eight months as part of his bail conditions, was sentenced to a community order for 18 months with rehabilitation and supervision requirements.

Alec Burns, defending said: “He is very sorry for having done this and very sorry she had to read what he had written.

“He did not see it at the time but she was helping him.

“He apologises and apologised very shortly afterwards.”

Mr Burns said Wright has now got a demolition job and is willing to work hard and stay out of trouble.

A spokeswoman for City Hospitals Sunderland NHS Foundation Trust said: “The NHS is a very diverse workforce and it is unacceptable for any member of our staff to be the subject of racial comments on social media whilst caring for patients.

“The Trust takes all forms of abuse very seriously, whether that be verbal, racial or violent, and we will not hesitate to support our staff by reporting such incidents.”

Sunderland Echo

dave-hammer

A Brexit supporter has admitted stealing Eddie Izzard’s pink beret during a pro-EU rally in London.

David Czerwonko, of Clitherow Road, Brentford snatched his hat while the comedian took part in a march to the cenotaph in Whitehall on 3 September, the court heard.

Izzard gave chase to the 26-year-old chef and reclaimed the headwear with help from police.

Czerwonko was fined £185, and ordered to pay a £30 victim surcharge and £85 court costs.

BBC News

A Britain First activist arrested during clashes with anti-Ukip protestors has admitted assaulting a demonstrator.

Mandy Smith, from Canterbury, is said to have retaliated after a camera was reportedly pointed at her face at the party’s spring conference at Margate’s Winter Gardens.

The 50-year-old was part of a group of activists who gathered outside the venue after declaring on Facebook they were “defending Nigel Farage from the leftwing rabble”.

The incident happened after demonstrators – led by Thanet Stand up to Ukip – marched up the hill to protest at the conference on Saturday.

Britain First posted on its Facebook page that Mandy Smith had been arrested.

It added fellow activists had “invaded” the police station to “support her” and later posted: “A big well done to Mandy and the other south east activists who defended the Ukip meeting yesterday.

“Freedom of speech will prevail.”

Britain First leader Paul Golding also posted support for Smith, later saying she was wrongfully arrested after pushing a camera away from her face.

Smith was dealt with by a method called restorative practice, in which she gave the victim – who suffered no injuries – a verbal apology.

For the method to be used, offenders must admit the offence, but they are not left with a criminal conviction.

Police spokesman Lisa Humphrys said: “A 50-year-old woman from Canterbury, who was arrested in Margate on suspicion of assault has been dealt with by way of restorative practice in liaison with the victim.

“Apart from this one incident, there have not been any physical confrontations and the protest was generally conducted peacefully.

“As with all such events, the primary role of Kent Police is to work with the partners to facilitate peaceful protest while ensuring public safety.”

Kent Online

A far-right activist who photographed a suspected rioter in a court corridor has been jailed for three weeks.

Amanda Smith, 52, snapped the defendant as he appeared at Canterbury Crown Court accused of violent disorder at the Dover riots.

Her lawyer, Kerry Waitt, attempted to claim Smith was a court reporter, having attended many of the riot hearings.

But Judge Adele Williams told Mr Waitt: “I don’t think you can compare this defendant and her activities to our very well-respected court reporter from the Kentish Gazette.”

Smith, of Shipman Avenue, Canterbury, was spotted by security staff taking the picture as others posed for it outside Court 6.

She has now been jailed for 21 days after admitting being in contempt of court.

The mum of two was told by the judge: “Your conduct was wholly unacceptable – especially taking a picture of someone waiting to be dealt with for violent disorder.”

It has been an offence for 91 years to take photographs in and around courts in England and Wales and is regarded as a common law contempt, attracting jail sentences.

Mr Waitt said Smith was “not present at what has now become known as the Dover Riots but she has an association with the South-East Alliance”, regarded as a far-right group.

He added: “This is a group which shares views on politics and immigration and other topical matters. They communicate with each other in chatrooms.

“And as she lives near to the court and it being school holidays she was encouraged by others and agreed to come to the court to report to families of those who were in court.”

He told Canterbury Crown Court that Smith worked at a “local education establishment” and now “bitterly regrets allowing herself to become involved” in taking the photograph.

“She was invited to take a photograph and didn’t apply her mind to what she was doing,” he said.

“She is now contrite and has learned her lesson.”

Judge Williams said security staff were aware that Smith had attended many of the hearings involving those alleged to have taken part in the riots in Dover in January.

Kent Online