ONE OF Britain’s biggest criminals was convicted at the Old Bailey yesterday of taking part in a drugs deal which was foiled by an undercover police operation.

Joseph Pyle, 56, of Morden, south London, will be sentenced later together with Frank Tyson, 62, of no fixed address, who acted as a courier in the deal involving class A drugs.

Peter Gillett, 32, described as a pop singer and bit part actor, was also convicted of taking part in a drugs deal. Gillett, of Burgess Hill, West Sussex, who claimed to have been ‘adopted’ by Reggie Kray, the gangster, while serving six years for armed robbery in Parkhurst prison, was found guilty of dealing in class A drugs.

Pyle masterminded two deals involving heroin and a heroin substitute worth an estimated pounds 300,000, the court was told. The three will be sentenced next month.

A fourth defendant, Terence Plummer, 55, a stuntman, of Leatherhead, Surrey, was acquitted of being involved in drug dealing.

Detectives from the South-east Regional Crime Squad drugs wing uncovered the deal after an informer was approached by Pyle and asked about buyers for heroin. An undercover detective moved in posing as a buyer and Pyle was kept under surveillance despite the fact he practised anti- surveillance measures designed to throw police off his trail.

The jury were told how the first deal to buy pounds 25,000 worth of heroin went wrong when one of Pyle’s men could not open the boot of an unmarked police car in which the drug was supposed to be left.

Despite the failure Pyle was anxious to strike a deal with the undercover officer, named only as ‘Dave’ in court.

He offered to sell the officer thousands of ampoules of morphine sulphate and opium stolen from a Ministry of Defence consignment after the Gulf war. The drugs were used to relieve the pain of wounded soldiers.

Pyle arranged to meet ‘Dave’ at the Sheraton Skyline hotel, Heathrow, in July last year. Before the meeting he was seen by police surveillance officers meeting Gillett at Burgh Heath, in Surrey.

Switching surveillance to Gillett, police witnessed him driving to Brighton where he met Tyson. Both men then went to a lock-up garage where they were seen placing black plastic bags believed to contain the drugs into the car.

They drove to Heathrow where Pyle instructed them to leave it in the back of another unmarked police car. Pyle was paid pounds 14,000 and was arrested as he left the hotel room. Gillett and Tyson were arrested at a neighbouring hotel.

The convictions came at the end of two trials estimated to have cost nearly pounds 1m.

The first, at Southwark Crown Court, was aborted after three members of the jury said they had been offered money to return not guilty verdicts. When they refused they were threatened with violence. During the latest trial, jurors were given 24-hour police protection and armed police were in court.

As a result of the investigation detectives made the biggest police seizure of heroin in Britain: 40kg (88lbs), worth an estimated pounds 8m, were recovered from a warehouse in Wimbledon, south London, in August last year.

Detectives say they did not have enough evidence to link the haul to the defendants although the chemical composition is identical to that seized from a man working for Pyle when the first drug deal failed.

The Independent

GANGSTER Reggie Kray’s ‘adopted’ son Peter Gillett swallowed a bag of heroin when police searched the house he was in, a court heard.

Gillett, 43, of Apsley Close, Bewbush, admitted unlawful possession of controlled Class A drug heroin when he faced Crawley Magistrates Court.

He was found with 6.872grams of the substance when a search warrant was issued to investigate a property in Caburn Court, Southgate.

Gillett hastily swallowed a bag of heroin on the arrival of the police and a bag similar to that he swallowed was found close to his head after he collapsed on the floor.

Another was found in his hand after he arrived at hospital.

Katherine Travis, prosecuting, said: “He went into a coma and was unconscious for seven days.

“The heroin was cut with a number of other substances. The street value was approximately 250.”

Gillett, who has claimed in the past Kray befriended him during their time in prison together and has insisted Reggie “sort of adopted him”, has suffered permanent damage from swallowing the large quantity of drugs.

Geoff White, defending, said: “It is not clear how much he swallowed but it was enough to permanently damage him.

“He is now having difficulty walking and remembering and functioning at all.

“He has done irreparable damage to his nervous system. He has had substantial prison sentences in the past and while in prison he became addicted to controlled drugs. On his release he was heavily addicted.

“He has realised his addiction has taken him close to the end and he has resolved never to take drugs again.”

Gillett was given a conditional discharge for three years and was ordered to pay 70 costs.

Crawley Observer

A further six men have been jailed for their involvement in violent demonstrations in Dover last January.

More than 70 people have been arrested in connection with the wide-scale disturbance on Saturday 30 January 2016, of whom 26 have since been sent to prison for offences ranging from violent disorder and affray to criminal damage and possession of an offensive weapon.

A further 27 have been charged and have court appearances scheduled for the weeks and months to come, while detectives continue to make further arrests and investigate other offences committed on the day.

Sentenced

On Thursday 25 August the following men were sentenced at Canterbury Crown Court:

James Whitbread, 39, of Mooring Road, Rochester, was jailed for four years after being found guilty of violent disorder. He was seen on footage covering his face and throwing items towards opposition protestors. He also assaulted a man.

Deaton Whitbread, 22, of Mooring Road, Rochester, received a three-year custodial sentence after being found guilty of violent disorder. He was filmed throwing an item at opposition protestors and breaking through a police cordon.

Roy Price, 51, of Bagleys Spring in Romford, Essex, was sentenced to two years’ imprisonment after admitting violent disorder. He was caught on camera shouting at and pushing two police officers, and also threw objects including a brick at opposition protestors. He must also serve an additional six months in prison after CS gas and a quantity of drugs were found during a search of his home address.

Nicholas Cullin, 40, of Robins Path in Benfleet, Essex, was jailed for two years after pleading guilty to violent disorder. He was seen on footage throwing objects including a bottle at opposition protestors, and engaging in other general violence.

Richard Williams, 31, from Bryngwran in Anglesey, Wales, received a two-year custodial sentence after admitting violent disorder. He was filmed kicking a man who was already being assaulted by a fellow protestor, as well as throwing objects at others.

Nathan Waller, 18, of Maes Meurig in Anglesey, Wales, was sentenced to two years’ imprisonment after pleading guilty to violent disorder. He was caught on camera assaulting a man with a number of other protestors.

Appalling violence

Detective Constable Kirsty Bricknell of Kent Police said: ‘Today marks the highest number of offenders sentenced on one day since the investigation into offences committed on 30 January began, and I am very happy with the results.

‘These six men contributed to some of the most appalling violence I have ever witnessed, causing a great deal of anguish for the people of Dover who were unfortunate enough to have had their town identified as the location for these demonstrations.

‘Kent Police has a statutory duty to facilitate peaceful protest but it has become obvious that many of those who attended on the day had no intention of doing anything other than fighting with those who held differing opinions to themselves.

‘Their behaviour was unacceptable and I hope these results send a clear message that such criminal actions will not be tolerated in Dover or anywhere else in Kent.’

Photos (clockwise from top left) – Deaton Whitbread, James Whitbread, Nicholas Cullin, Richard Williams, Roy Price and Nathan Waller.

Whitbreads-etc-collage

Kent Police

A vandal who painted offensive graffiti on a random pub and house ‘has no idea’ why he did so.

Kieron Wright, 23, used black paint to daub slogans onto the wall of a house in Hylton Road, and the nearby Railway Tavern pub, Sunderland magistrates heard.

The court was told the properties were randomly selected, and had nothing to do with what was written on them.

Prosecutor Lee Poppett said: “This case concerns three offences of graffiti, for want of a better term.”

Mr Poppett said a rented property was defaced twice, on July 3, and July 7.

And on July 4, he repeated the offence on an outside wall of the Railway Tavern.

Mr Poppett added: “There is no suggestion that either of the premises were targeted in any way, or racially motivated in any way.

“Mr Wright has taken it upon himself to write on them in black paint.”

He was identified from CCTV footage and when police searched his house, they found a small amount of cannabis bush.

Wright, of Rosedale Street, Sunderland, admitted three counts of criminal damage, possession of cannabis, and breaching two conditional discharges.

He has 33 previous convictions for a total of 47 offences, five of which were criminal damage.

Tony Southwick, defending, said: “The second incident on July 7, he painted over what he had previously painted. He added a little bit extra.

“This was not targeted in any way. It’s not racially aggravated because he would not have known who the landlord was.

“He has no explanation as to why he has done this.

“He accepts that the small quantity of cannabis in the house was for his own personal use. He tells me it’s barely enough to make one joint.

“He was laid off from work in May and he uses cannabis more or less on a daily basis because he is bored.”

Wright was sentenced to a six-month community order with 10 days’ specified activity.

He was told to pay a £50 fine, and £110 in compensation.

Sunderland Echo

Three protesters were racially abused at a ‘Unite Against Fascism’ march.

Tony Hyam, 48, screamed ‘You bunch of n**** lovers’ at the protesters in Villiers Street, central London.

Hyam also screamed ‘Refugees are not welcome’ at the three women, Westminster Magistrates Court heard.

Speakers at the event included Diane Abbott MP, poet Michael Rosen and comedian Jeremy Hardy.

Kate Shilton, prosecuting, said: ‘On March 19 a group of people were attending a Unite Against Fascism rally.

‘As the three victims, Jasmine Jackin, Zlatka Jakin, and Nadia Jackin turned onto Villiers Road, the defendant began shouting abuse and racial slurs towards the group.

‘He called them a “bunch of n**** lovers”, “dirty n*****” and shouted “refugees are not welcome here”.

Ms Shilton told the court the victims had been profoundly affected by the harassment.

Reading a statement from Zlatka Jackin, the mother of the two other victims, she said: ‘I now realise some people still regard others as a lower class or lower race.

‘It made me very upset.’

Hyam admitted using threatening or abusive words, one count of racially aggravated harassment.

Judge Joanna Matson adjourned the case for reports before sentence on September 15 at Westminster Magistrates Court.

Hyam, of Shearwood Crescent, Bexley, pleaded guilty to one count of threatening behaviour and one of racially aggravated harassment.

Court News

Geoffrey Farquharson sent a racist and homophobic voice message to Ben Bradshaw the day before Jo Cox MP was killed

Geoffrey Farquharson, 37, leaves Exeter magistrates court after receiving a 12-week prison sentence, suspended for two years. Photograph: Rod Minchin/PA

Geoffrey Farquharson, 37, leaves Exeter magistrates court after receiving a 12-week prison sentence, suspended for two years. Photograph: Rod Minchin/PA

A man who sent a threatening voice message to senior Labour MP Ben Bradshaw the day before the killing of parliamentary colleague Jo Cox has been given a suspended sentence.

In the two-minute message Geoffrey Farquharson, 37, shouts down the phone, swears repeatedly and makes threats towards the former culture secretary. The racist and homophobic message, which was left on the answerphone of Bradshaw’s parliamentary office, was sent the day before Labour MP Cox was killed in June this year.

The message made Bradshaw fearful for the safety of his staff, Exeter magistrates court heard. District Judge Stephen Nichols sentenced Farquharson to 12 weeks’ imprisonment, suspended for two years.

He was also given a 25-day community order, banned indefinitely from contacting Bradshaw or attending his constituency office, and ordered to pay £85 prosecution costs.

The judge told him: “The message was clearly homophobic, Islamophobic and racist and there was clearly a death threat to Mr Bradshaw.

“You accept through your guilty plea that the message you sent to Mr Bradshaw was highly offensive. In the message, your voice became extremely angry and you make threats and use highly offensive and abusive language.”

In the message, which was played to the court, Farquharson starts by giving his full name and address and says he has just watched a video on Facebook about Muslim extremism.

Farquharson then launches a homophobic tirade against Bradshaw, who is gay, and repeatedly goads the MP to call the police. The defendant uses highly offensive language throughout, and describes Bradshaw as “evil”.

The call was picked up by a member of the MP’s staff, who raised the alarm. After Bradshaw reported the matter to the police, Farquharson was arrested the following day.

The court heard that the MP had made a victim impact statement, in which he said: “Having had death threats before I was not unduly concerned about myself and more concerned about my staff, particularly in Exeter, who have borne the brunt of Mr Farquharson.”

He went on to say that public servants should not have to put up with threats and abuse from members of the public and that his concerns had been heightened because of the killing of Cox.

At a previous hearing, Farquharson, of Exeter, had pleaded guilty to sending an indecent or grossly offensive message. Farquharson, who suffers from mental health issues, was accompanied by his carer when he returned to court to be sentenced.

The judge heard that Farquharson had autism and a difficult upbringing. Rob Jacobs, defending, said Farquharson’s “anger and annoyance” had been building up at what he saw as “concerns for others” and he had “lost his temper”.

Jacobs said: “Mr Farquharson is both very vulnerable and probably a very lonely individual. I don’t think he would mind me saying that that he has too much time to think and ruminate on his political views. It is true that his political views are strongly held.

“He would say that he does not hold homophobic or racist views himself and the words he used were a manifestation of his anger and frustration, rather than him holding any anti-social views.”

Last week, Bradshaw said the abuse dished out to politicians on social media had got worse since the death of Cox. He told the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire show he believed it was now “socially acceptable” to use Facebook and Twitter to abuse politicians and he hoped the killing would lead to a “deeper reflection” about the political culture in the UK.

The Guardian

GAF 1

GAF 2

An impatient man made racist remarks and gave a Nazi salute while he was at Blackpool police headquarters.

Darren Dale was annoyed because he thought the wait to see whether police would recommend he got a peddlars licence was too long,

Dale, , 37, of Reads Avenue, Blackpool, pleaded guilty to racially aggravated threatening behaviour.

He was sentenced to a 12 months community order with up to 20 days rehabilitation to be supervised by the probation service, put on an eight weeks curfew and ordered to pay £85 costs with £85 victims’ surcharge by Blackpool magistrates.

Prosecutor, Martine Connah, said Dale went into Blackpool police station to ask about a peddlars certificate on July 15. An inquiry assistant told him an inspector was considering the matter. He replied the country was done for and kept making racist remarks under his breath.

The assistant said his remarks were inappropriate considering the recent events in France. Dale gave a Nazi salute and said: “I’m going to change my religion and kill people.”
Peter Cave, defending, told the court Dale had been waiting for six weeks for his peddlars license and became distressed.

Blackpool Gazette

DD

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