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DARREN Fee, 41, of Falmouth Road, Alvaston, was given a one-year restraining order, was fined £165 and was ordered to pay £300 costs, a £520 criminal courts charge and a £20 victim surcharge for using threatening or abusive words or behaviour likely to cause harassment, alarm or distress that was racially aggravated in Derby on April 19.

Derby Telegraph

A man has been jailed for three and a half years after admitting killing another man with a single punch.

Ruben White, 22, of Kingswood Road, Gillingham, was sentenced for the manslaughter of Saulius Klevinskas at Maidstone Crown Court today, Friday.

White was arrested following the death of 35-year-old Mr Klevinskas in Balmoral Road, Gillingham on August 21 last year. The incident happened outside a shop where White and three other man were sitting in a car.

Mr Klevinskas, who was originally from Lithuania, but was living in Grays, Essex. was coming out of the shop with two friends when it was alleged that someone in the car threw a can at them.

An argument began and Mr Klevinskas then went over to the car and smashed a window. White got out of the vehicle and an altercation between the two groups broke out. Mr Klevinskas received a single punch causing him to fall to the floor. He died from his injuries five days later at Medway Maritime Hospital with his family by his bedside.

After sentencing, DI Geoff Payne said: `This was a violent assault which had fatal and devastating consequences. Ruben White may not have intended to kill a man that day, but his aggressive actions and thoughtlessness resulted in the most devastating circumstances imaginable.

“I would like to thank the witnesses and residents for their help in coming forward to help with the police investigation into this incident. I would also like to thank the off duty Accident and Emergency Nurse who was at the scene and helped attended to the victim before the ambulance could arrive.
“This was a tragic case and highlights how one person’s irresponsible actions can prove fatal. If other people find themselves in this situation hopefully they will not act so senselessly, as it is clear from this incident that even one punch can prove to be fatal.’

Kent Online

Story from 2011.

In a quiet cul-de-sac off Beverley Road, a neighbour peered over her garden wall into the back yard of 7 May Street.

She could hardly believe her eyes, but there appeared to be a foot sticking out from under a duvet.

The woman called police, reporting what appeared to be a body in next door’s yard.

She did not know there were in fact two, and she had stumbled upon the scene of East Yorkshire’s first double murder for nearly 20 years.

He had long since fled, but Phillip Simmons, 38, one of several residents at the privately rented property, had turned 7 May Street into a house of horrors.

The burly and intimidating 16.5st thug had murdered housemate Daniel Hatfield, 52, who weighed just 6st, and his friend Matthew Higgins, 49, who was only paying him a visit.

It may never be known who was killed first, but Simmons told police it was Mr Hatfield, which would mean Mr Higgins was simply in the wrong place at the wrong time.

For after attacking his first victim in the kitchen, and continuing the assault with a variety of weapons after dragging him into the yard, Simmons walked back into the house and found the second man standing in the kitchen.

He took a “calculated”, instant decision to kill him too, later telling police: “I thought that I had no choice, I’m gonna have to do him as well.

The two murders were almost identical, involving beating and the use of multiple weapons.

It was a grim task that befell the officer who had to remove the duvet.

But in an exclusive interview with the Mail, the officer who led the inquiry revealed that other potential victims crossed Simmons’s path, and may have been lucky to escape with their lives.

After the second killing, Simmons walked back into the house and found someone else in the kitchen, a woman who also lived there.

The killer decided to leave.

Detective Chief Inspector Tony Cockerill said she may be “simply lucky to be alive, considering the mindset of Simmons at the time, having just murdered two men who were no threat to him, one after the other.

“He’d reached a tipping point in his life where he’d committed these crimes.

“He had nothing to lose and could see where this would end up, and that was prison for the rest of his life.”

Simmons was on the run, but he was already a suspect and evidence was being quickly gathered against him.

He dumped his trainers in the bin at a “local address”, but these were recovered.

As well as retrieving forensic evidence from the scene and making inquiries locally, police continued filling in any gaps in their knowledge even after Simmons was arrested.

Det Chief Insp Cockerill said: “We spent some considerable time creating a timeline between the murders and his arrest to help us understand what had happened and where our evidential opportunities lay.”

It is thought Simmons spent just two days at large before he was arrested after a robbery at a Betfred bookmakers in Preston Road, east Hull, from which he hoped to fund his flight from justice.

Simmons, whom police describe as “a physically imposing, large man”, threatened the manager with a broken bottle, and demanded money.

Police say the manager was wise not to have challenged Simmons, handing over the £2,800 he took.

Det Chief Insp Cockerill said: “It was that decision and good fortune that he was not seriously injured, or worse, because Simmons knew what he’d done, he knew he was wanted, he had nothing to lose, and he’s an extremely violent and volatile individual.

“Simmons is capable of remarkable levels of violence.”

The officer said it is one of the worst cases he has seen.

“I’ve seen worse injuries,” he said, “but to have one after the other in such a premeditated way, which for me is an illustration and indication of where he was psychologically at the time, where he’s thinking that’s a rational decision, where a man has used horrendous levels of violence in two murders, is shocking.”

Det Chief Insp Cockerill praised relatives of the victims for the dignity they showed in court yesterday, when Simmons admitted two counts of murder and robbery.

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Judge Jeremy Richardson QC told the killer: “Phillip Simmons, you have pleaded guilty to two exceptionally serious crimes, and the crime of robbery.

“In respect of the murder convictions, there is but one sentence I shall be passing in due course, and that is a life sentence incumbent on each of the two counts.

“The only issue for determination is the minimum term that should be served in this case.

“There is an argument that I should impose a whole life term, but cogent arguments have been advanced as to why I should not take that course.

“I make it clear at this juncture I have not made any decision.

“At present I keep an open mind, but it is only right that I should indicate that I take, of course, an exceptionally serious view of such an exceptionally serious case.”

Hull Daily Mail

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CAUGHT OUT: Alan Boulter, left, being confronted by national paedophile hunters.

CAUGHT OUT: Alan Boulter, left, being confronted by national paedophile hunters.

TWO paedophile hunters trapped and filmed a man who thought he was meeting a vulnerable 13-year-old girl for sex after talking to her on Facebook.

He wanted some “naughty fun” and offered to pay the girl £50 for sex but she did not actually exist and instead he got a “nasty surprise” from the two vigilantes, a court heard.

The paedophile hunters streamed live coverage of their confrontation with the sexual predator on Facebook.

Alan Boulter, 52, of Pershore Avenue, Grimsby, admitted attempting to meet a child following sexual grooming between November 21 and December 20.

Megan Rhys, prosecuting, told Grimsby Crown Court that Boulter intended to meet a 13-year-old girl called Chloe that he believed he had been communicating with on Facebook.

But she did not exist and it was trap by a paedophile hunter who had set up fake profiles in the names of Shannon and Chloe.

He went to Grimsby railway station for the supposed meeting but was confronted by two vigilantes who filmed the encounter and streamed it live over Facebook to expose him.

This was seen by a neighbour of his, who was so concerned about his safety that she contacted the police, who went to his home. The vigilantes passed a disk of the internet conversations to the police.

Boulter told police he exchanged messages in a Facebook chatroom to the girl he thought was 13-year-old Shannon and the conversations became sexual.

He spoke about having sex with the girl but claimed that, once she told him she was 13, he was not interested in her sexually.

He chatted with Chloe for about a week and thought that both girls lived in the same care home in Doncaster.

He claimed that he received a telephone call from Chloe saying she was running away and a later call saying that she was at Grimsby railway station and was frightened.

Boulter claimed that his “intention was simply to take her home”, said Miss Rhys.

“It was dark and she was scared and he denied any sexual intentions to her.”

He was confronted at the station by the two men.

After the messages from the disk were downloaded, it emerged that he was after “naughty fun” and was looking for a female to come and see him for sex.

He asked her intimate questions and suggested things he would like to do to her. He wanted to have sex with her but she should not tell anyone because it was illegal. He would pay her £50 for this and would meet her at the station.

“She was not to come and see him if she didn’t want sex,” said Miss Rhys.

“There was nobody that actually existed for him to carry out the activity with, however.”

Julia Baggs, mitigating, said that Boulter made admissions, co-operated with police and understood the seriousness of the offence.

The ex-lorry driver had no previous convictions and worked in security for 16 years.

“He is ashamed and remorseful about his behaviour,” said Miss Baggs.

“It is fortunate that, on this occasion, there was no direct victim.”

Judge Mark Bury said: “It’s no thanks to him, though. He did everything he could to meet a 13-year-old girl.”

He told Boulter: “You went to Grimsby railway station intending to meet a 13-year-old child.

“You were under the impression that she was a vulnerable person in care and was running away and that she had come to meet you for sex.

“You got a nasty surprise when you arrived at the railway station.

“You were confronted by two men who filmed that confrontation.

“It’s clear that you were prepared to have sexual intercourse with a 13-year-old girl, possibly more than one.

“You offered to pay her. Of course, all of this was a scam. There was no 13-year-old girl but you did everything you could to make that happen.

“No harm has, in fact, been caused to any person. It’s clear that you intended very serious sexual offending against a child of 13.”

Boulter was jailed for 20 months and was given a 10-year sexual harm prevention order. He must register as a sex offender for 10 years.

Grimsby Telegraph

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Kevin Gaffin, 41, stormed round to the victim’s home in a fit of rage suspecting he was to blame for him being banned from pubs in Weybridge

A feud between two members of a working men’s club ended with one of them threatening to chop the other man’s head off with a meat cleaver.

The simmering tension came to the boil after Kevin Gaffin, 41, suspected Scott Rowlatt was to blame for him being banned from pubs in the Weybridge area, a court heard on Thursday.

The defendant, who was carrying a meat cleaver, stormed round to Mr Rowlatt’s home in Weybridge and caused £1,000 worth of damage to his van and vowed to decapitate him, Guildford Crown Court was told.

Gaffin, of St Mary’s Road in Weybridge, was jailed for three years after pleading guilty to making a threat to kill, criminal damage and unlawfully having a bladed article in a public place.

The court was told there was bad feeling between the two men, who were both members of Oatlands Park Working Mens Club, Weybridge.

Nick Hall, prosecuting, said the defendant went to the house where Mr Rowlatt was living on September 16 last year.

“The defendant was intoxicated and was carrying a meat cleaver,” he said.

Mr Hall said Gaffin banged on the door which was answered by another man who tried to calm him down.

He said that the defendant shouted: “I’m going to chop his f*****g head off.”

Mr Hall said during the disturbance, Gaffin struck Mr Rowlatt’s van repeatedly causing an estimated £1,000 worth of damage.

“He blamed Mr Rowlatt for getting him banned from bars in Weybridge,” he said.

Police were called and the defendant was arrested.

The court heard Gaffin had previous convictions for threatening behaviour and being drunk and disorderly.

Keith Goodhand, defending, said his client had been drinking when the offences were committed.

“He’s under no illusions that it’s going to be custodial sentence this afternoon,” he said.

Mr Goodhand stressed Gaffin had only carried the meat cleaver and had never actually brandished it in any way.

“He had a burning sense of grievance at the time,” he said.

Passing sentence, Judge Jonathan Black advised Gaffin to take steps to control his drinking and his behaviour to avoid coming back to court in future.

Get Surrey

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A Forest Town man has been jailed for 14 years after police arrived at a house to find him strangling his ex-partner.

Joe Liffen was seen by an officer with his hands around the throat of the victim, who had lost consciousness, following a brutal and sustained attack, during which time he also punched the victim repeatedly.

Liffen, 26, of Cardle Close, jumped out of the bedroom window and fled after Nottinghamshire Police arrived at the scene at the victim’s home in Mansfield Woodhouse, in the early hours of November 15 2016.

Liffen admitted causing grievous bodily harm, breaching a restraining order and conspiracy to pervert the course of justice at a previous hearing. At Nottingham Crown Court today (Thursday 9 February) he was sentenced to 11 years for GBH, three years for conspiracy to pervert the course of justice, to run consecutively and one year for breaching a restraining order, to run concurrently.

His aunt, Samantha Bailey, 48, of Chapel Fields, Ravenshead, was also sentenced to 15 months in prison after admitting conspiracy to pervert the course of justice.

The court was told Liffen had previously received an 18-week jail sentence for assaulting the victim in March 2015 and a two-year restraining order, effective from his release, banning him from making contact with her. Despite the order he repeatedly made contact with her and tried to rekindle their relationship.

Liffen had a drink and drugs problem and was a “jealous” man, the court was told.

On the day of the latest assault, Liffen told the victim he was going to visit his ex-wife in Manchester. She then went for a night out with friends in Mansfield and was given a lift home by a male friend, who came into the house to use her downstairs toilet. When she went upstairs Liffen was waiting for her and put his hand over her mouth and told her not to speak, before throwing her on to the bed and repeatedly punching her in the face and head.

The 16st Liffen then sat on top of the 8st victim and started to strangle her.

Her friend heard the ordeal from downstairs and phoned the police, who arrived quickly and entered the house while the attack was still ongoing, before Liffen escaped.

The victim regained consciousness but started having seizures. She suffered bruising to her face and head, neck and throat and had a one-inch cut to the top of her left thigh.

Officers tracked down Liffen later that day and arrested him.

The court was told that while Liffen was remanded in custody in connection with the offence he sent numerous texts to the victim, trying to encourage her not to turn up to court to give evidence against him.

He also colluded with Bailey in an attempt to make her miss the court appearance.

The court was told Bailey paid for a hotel and beauty treatments in Nottingham for the victim on the day of the court appearance before sending a text saying “I’m making someone disappear.”

Speaking after the case, Temporary Detective Inspector Nikki Smith, of Nottinghamshire Police, who led the investigation, said: “This was a vicious, sustained attack on a vulnerable woman who had no chance of defending herself.

“She is lucky to be alive after the attack and, as the judge said, if it hadn’t been for the fast response of our officers this could have had an even more serious ending.

“Both Liffen and Bailey also put pressure on this vulnerable woman to miss her court date in an attempt to avoid justice being done.

“Domestic violence will not be tolerated in any form in Nottinghamshire and we would urge anyone who is a victim or a witness to domestic abuse to call us and we will do everything in our power to bring the perpetrators before the court.”

Mansfield Chad

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A former soldier has been jailed for five years for battering a Good Samaritan who was trying to stop him attacking his wife.

David Creswick was throttling his wife after a row in Sheffield city centre last Christmas, then knocked a passer-by unconscious after he tried to prevent the attack.

Father-of-four Creswick ran and hid behind a car from passing armed police officers – but returned to hit his victim in the face as the man lay motionless on the floor.

The victim suffered bleeding on the brain, a fractured skull and had to spend two weeks in hospital over Christmas last year due to the surgery he needed.

Sheffield Crown Court heard the victim lost his sense of smell because of his injuries and has been unable to work for a year, leaving him struggling to pay his bills.

In a statement read out to court, the man said: “I have no memory of the attack but was sickened to learn the attacker continued to hit me as I lay on the ground. Knowing I may never be able to smell again is depressing and has affected my quality of life.”

Creswick, aged 30, of Mason Lathe Road, Shiregreen, had been on a Christmas night out with family and friends.

He had already been involved in two altercations before the incident.

David Wain, prosecuting, said the victim and his partner had driven past Creswick and his wife on Broad Lane in Sheffield just before midnight on December 19 last year.

After seeing Creswick with his hands around the throat of his wife, they stopped in an attempt to intervene.

Mr Wain said: “The victim’s recollection is the defendant coming towards him and then waking up in an ambulance.”

After being arrested, Creswick demanded to know why his victim had not been arrested as well and when told the man was on the way to hospital said: “Good, I’m glad he is unconscious.”

Creswick initially claimed he had been attacked from behind and was acting in self-defence but CCTV showed he was the aggressor.

The court heard Creswick had a previous conviction from September 2015 for spitting at a police officer.

Francis Edusei, defending, said his client has written a letter of apology which ‘expresses his disgust at himself and his remorse at his behaviour’.

Mr Edusei said earlier in the evening Creswick had been in the Players Bar on West Street when somebody had pushed him, causing a drink to spill on him.

“There was a remonstration with this person who proceeded to hit the defendant,” he said.

Mr Edusei said Creswick was hit again by somebody else outside the club.

He said his client wanted to go home but his wife wanted to stay out, leading to the argument.

Mr Edusei said Creswick wrongly thought the man he attacked on Broad Lane was one of the two men from the bar.

He said Creswick was ‘a hard-working man’ who had previously been a soldier before being given a medical discharge from the forces.

Judge Michael Slater jailed Creswick for five years for the Section 18 assault.

He told him: “The victim has received life-changing injuries and is understandably depressed and feels vulnerable.

“That is something you and you alone have caused.”

Following the case, investigating officer Detective Constable Newman Holt said: “This was an unprovoked attack on a member of the public, who stepped in to help a woman who appeared to be in distress.

“As a result of Creswick’s angry and sustained assault, the victim suffered significant injuries that have had long-lasting effects.

“His senseless actions that evening have changed this victim’s life forever and no jail term is going to make up for that.”

Sheffield Star

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