Archive

Tag Archives: curfew

Drunken thugs boasted on Facebook about starting a ‘war’ in a pizza shop after attacking and racially abusing workers, smashing a door and hurling pizza boxes around the shop.

Brothers Jamie York, 32, and John Alexander Brown, 19, both of Greenwood Avenue, Mansfield Woodhouse and Shaun Andrew Bowers , 35, of Crompton Road, Mansfield were caught on CTTV in Chicho’s on High Street, Mansfield Woodhouse.

All three had been to Bowers’ grandfather’s funeral on January 26, had been drinking and went for food at the shop before 8pm that day.

However, Mansfield Magistrates’ Court heard how an argument broke out over the size of a pizza and things ‘turned very badly’, according to defence solicitor for Brown and York, Chris Perry.

The court was shown extensive CCTV footage of the incident which showed punches being thrown, pizza boxes and dishes being hurled between both the defendants and the shop workers. Racial insults and threats were also heard.

At one point Brown is seen picking up a ‘wet-floor’ plastic sign and throwing it at the staff. The staff can also be seen swinging a wooden stick around to defend themselves.

One member had to be later taken to hospital with bruising and swelling.

Brown was seen later seen returning to the shop and kicking the door, damaging it.

Two of the three defendants were later found to have posted entries on Facebook with what prosecutor Robert Carr described as ‘rejoicing at what they called a war’, and laughing and bragging.

But in mitigation, the court was told how the defendants do not consider themselves to be racist and insults may have been shouted in the heat of the moment.

Mr Perry said: “They did not intend to cause trouble, there were events that led to this inexcusable behaviour.

“The catalyst for it was very innocuous.”

Bowers admitted racially-aggravated provocation of violence and was handed a 12-month community order with 200 hours of unpaid work, £200 compensation and £145 in costs.

Brown admitted criminal damage and two counts of assault, while York admitted racially-aggravated criminal damage and two counts of racially-aggravated assaults.

They each received 18 weeks’ jail for the assaults, plus four weeks for the criminal damage charges, all suspended for 12 months.

They each had to pay £750 in compensation, Brown was also given 200 hours of unpaid work while York was given a three-month curfew order.

All three were handed a one-year restraining order to not enter the pizza shop.

Mansfield Chad

c1

c2

C3

Advertisements

A 42-year-old man appeared in court for carrying a pen that could double-up as an offensive weapon in Dover.

Darren Vincent from Gillingham was arrested after he was spotted carrying a “Military/Tactical Pen” in Folkestone Road on January 30, when far-right and anti-fascist protesters clashed in Dover.

Then pen is typically made out of solid metal. It can be used as a “last-ditch self-defence tool”.

Vincent appeared at Thanet Magistrates Court on June 6 and was sentenced to 77 days in prison suspended for 12 months.

He was ordered to carry out 100 hours of unpaid work in the next 12 months and was given a three month curfew to stay at home between 9pm and 5am.

He must also pay £85 in costs and an £80 victim surcharge.

Dover Express

DV

Magistrates expressed surprise that no-one else was charged alongside Keith Edward Hall, 38, of Bath Street, Rhyl

Keith Hill

A man has been given a suspended prison sentence for a firework attack on a mosque.

Magistrates saw video footage which showed Keith Edward Hall twice approaching the Islamic Centre in Rhyl, lighting the fireworks and pushing them through the letterbox on November 11.

In the background, a man and woman could be heard laughing and shouting: “Hurry up.”

Having seen the film, Prestatyn magistrates expressed surprise that no-one else has been charged in connection with the attack.

Hall, 38, of Bath Street, Rhyl, had pleaded guilty to religiously aggravated criminal damage at the centre in Water Street.

In the footage, filmed from the doorway of the Bow Bar opposite, Hall was seen approaching the mosque twice in 20 minutes.

In a victim impact statement, Rafiq Ullah, the centre’s treasurer, said the damage could have been much greater had they not taken measures to improve fire safety after a previous incident.

He said people could easily have been injured as the prayer room was behind the door.

The incident occurred only two days before the Paris shootings, and Mr Ullah said tension at the mosque was high in that period. It eased when Hall was arrested.

When interviewed, Hall said he could remember very little about the incident because he had drunk eight litres of cider and eight shorts.

He woke up the following morning with a sore arm where part of the letterbox surround had hit him when it was blown off.

He denied being a racist and claimed to have several friends from ethnic minorities.

Alex Fitzgerald, representing Hall, said he found it “astonishing” that no-one else had been charged even though they were interviewed.

Mr Fitzgerald told the court that Hall did not even realise that the building was a mosque.

“It was not born out of a deep-seated hate of the Muslim community, but was an act of utter stupidity,” he said.

“He is embarrassed at his stupidity and wishes to apologise. Alcohol affects his thinking and his behaviour.”

Hall was given a 16-week prison sentence suspended for 12 months, and must also observe a 7pm-7am curfew and attend a six-month alcohol treatment course and 25 days of rehabilitation.

He was also ordered to pay compensation of £558, costs of £300 and a surcharge of £80.

The Bench made a restraining order prohibiting him from entering Water Street for 12 months.

Daily Post

KH 1

KH 2

KH 3

KH 4

KH 5

Liam Edwards at Manchester Magistrates Court

Liam Edwards at Manchester Magistrates Court

A man who went into his local Sainsbury’s supermarket and stuck stickers on packets of meat that read “beware halal is barbaric and funds terrorism” has been given a month-long curfew.

Liam Gary Edwards, 29, today pleaded guilty to racially aggravated criminal damage on the day of his trial but insisted that he was protesting against the halal slaughter of animals after watching a television documentary.

The self-proclaimed “animal lover” stuck nine stickers with the hashtag #banhalal on halal poultry products after obtaining the stickers over the internet.

At an earlier hearing held at Manchester and Salford Magistrates’ Court, the van driver pleaded guilty to possession of cannabis after police found the Class B during a search of his home in Chancel Avenue, Ordsall, following the incident.

Today the same court was told that CCTV captured Edwards going into the supermarket on Regent Road, Salford, on February 20 with his girlfriend and two young children.

Later staff at the store became aware of the stickers on various packets of chicken breasts, thighs and a whole chicken worth £16.50 which could no longer be sold due to concerns for contamination.

Upon searching the hashtag term on Twitter, staff found images of the stickers on trollies and point of sale displays.

For the prosecution, Miss Lisa Connor said that upon his arrest Edwards apologised to officers.

She said: “He accepted he had been in possession of the stickers and placed them on various items. He got involved in a Twitter conversation about halal and maintains that his whole motivation was his concern for the way in which halal meat is obtained and what happens in abattoirs.”

She added that he had never disputed the offence and accepted the prosecution’s case

“He maintained he wasn’t motivated by any racial prejudice he just wanted to highlight the cruelty involved. He admitted he was sorry for his actions.”

The court heard that he had no similar matters on his record.

For Edwards, Mr Lee Hammond said that after watching a documentary on how livestock were dealt with in slaughterhouses he had taken to Twitter.

There he came across others who shared views of what they perceived to be “unfavourable methods” and one sent him the stickers.

Mr Hammond said: “Unfortunately the group he had found had more extreme views that went in to religion, funding and terrorism.”

He added that there had not been any complaints to the store or the police by members of the Muslim community.

Edwards told the bench: “I’m a big animal lover, be it for racial or other purposes I believe it is wrong to treat animals in that way.”

In passing sentence of a four-week curfew for the two offences to run between 9pm and 7am, chairman Mrs Vanessa Goldstone said it had not been “a run-of-the-mill case”.

He must also pay £100 prosecution costs, £60 surcharge and £16.50 compensation.

Manchester Evening News

LEle 1

le 2

DRUGS CHARGES ... clockwise, from top left, Thomas Allen, Deborah Ritchie, Daniel Sayers and Adam Sayers.

DRUGS CHARGES … clockwise, from top left, Thomas Allen, Deborah Ritchie, Daniel Sayers and Adam Sayers.

FOUR drug dealers were arrested when police launched an undercover operation to tackle city centre crime.

Officers who posed as users ‘Gary and Emma’ were easily able to buy drugs from strangers they met while hanging around the busy streets of Sunderland.

Over a period of weeks the covert cops were regularly offered and sold cannabis.

On one occasion they were able to buy diamorphine during a deal that took place near Hudson Street Primary School.

As a result of the operation, Adam Sayers, 27 and Deborah Ritchie, 28, both of Somerset Street, Daniel Sayers, 31, of Hill View Square and Thomas Allen, 29, of Guildford Street, all in Sunderland, all admitted drugs charges.

All four have dozens of previous convictions for a variety of offences.

Prosecutor Micahael Hodson told Newcastle Crown Court; “This was an investigation into crime generally, in the centre of Sunderland.

“The prosecution say Adams Sayers is the busiest of all and he involved his girlfriend Miss Ritchie.

“Daniel Sayers made the first approach to the two officers, who were sitting on a wall in Sunderland town centre.

“The crown submit they are street dealers.”

The court heard the first meeting with the undercover officers was in early April last year.

The operation came to an end in August when the home of Sayers and Ritchie was raided and 14 wraps of cannabis were found.

Between those dates the officers had been able to purchase small amount of drugs, in exchange for cash, cigarettes and even razors.

The deals were often arranged via mobile phone after the initial street meeting in April.

Adam Sayers, who admitted supplying and offering to supply cannabis, was jailed for nine months.

Ritchie, who admitted supplying and offering to supply cannabis, was sentenced to four months imprisonment, suspended for 18 months, with a two month curfew.

Allen, who admitted supplying cannabis, was sentenced to four month imprisonment, suspended for 18 months with supervision and a two month curfew.

Daniel Sayers, who admitted one charge of supplying diamorphine, was jailed for nine months , consecutive to a sentence he is serving for unrelated offences.

Judge Paul Sloan QC told them: “Your offending was detected as a result of a police operation where two undercover officers were deployed to operate covertly in Sunderland.”

The judge said he accepted Ritchie, who has turned her back on trouble and is co-operating fully with officials who are trying to help her, and Allen, who has no previous convictions for drugs offences and has settled down with a family, were lesser involved.

The court heard the diamophine handed over by Daniel Sayers during his brief involvement was worth less than £10 and he exchanged it for 100 cigarettes.

Alec Burns, defending, said the class A drug was in prescription tablet form, which got ground down during the exchange near the school.

Mr Burns said; “It was not someone who had heroin ready to supply, it was someone who improvised at the time.”

The court heard Adam Sayers has been diagnosed with health problems and has vowed to turn his back on trouble.

Sunderland Echo

The EDL supporter in this article is Tommy Allan

TA 1

TA

A FORMER bakery worker who threatened to ‘kick his boss’s head in’ sent threatening messages over a social networking site after losing his job.

Stuart Alexander Baines, 30, of Briarwood Court in Beverley Road, Malton, began sending abusive messages over Facebook to his boss Andy Mayer after being suspended from his job at Yorkshire Baker, based in Malton, Scarborough magistrate’s court was told.

Neil Holdsworth, on behalf of the Crown Prosecution Service, told the court that Baines had begun making threats after he was suspended on March 18 before leaving a threatening message on the work phone warning Mr Mayer “he was coming to get you one by one.”

Mr Holdsworth said: “Stuart was making threats on Facebook including one that said ‘Andy you are going to get your head kicked in.’

“The post was extremely threatening and of cause for concern for Mr Mayer and his colleagues. He felt concerned for his safety.”

Baines, who pleaded guilty on May 13 to sending threatening messages on March 19, was diagnosed with psychosis at the age of 13 and has struggled with drink and drug problems, the court was told.

Representing Baines, Mike Farr said that Baines had not touched any drink or drugs for some time now but at the time of the incident he had not been taking his medication to help with his psychosis.

He said: “When this incident occurred he had split from his partner and for two weeks he had been living alone.

“He had not been taking his medication and I am sure that that played some part in his foolishness. He was feeling at somewhat of a low ebb so he posted the comments on Facebook and I think made one phone call. He realises that it was inappropriate behaviour.”

Farr went on to say that Baines had apologised for his actions and had not been in court for about four years, with a previous conviction for assault.

Baines was fined a total of £145 for sending the threatening messages over the site, broken down as £85 court costs and a £60 surcharge. He was also given a six month community order with a supervision requirement and a four week curfew from 6pm-6am each day.

York Press

SC

SC1

Stefan Adamson, wearing a David Cameron mask, attending a previous court hearing

Stefan Adamson, wearing a David Cameron mask, attending a previous court hearing

A MAN has been found guilty of stealing a charm bracelet worth £1,500 in what a judge called a “mean offence”.

Stefan Adamson, aged 26, had denied the theft of the Pandora bracelet but was found guilty by a jury after a trial at Plymouth Crown Court.

He snatched the bracelet as he walked out of the woman’s home at the end of their relationship on December 17 last year.

Adamson, of Rougemont Gardens, Eggbuckland, admitted taking the piece of jewellery but denied dishonesty.

He claimed he was going to use the bracelet as a “bargaining toll” to force his ex-partner to return his property which he claimed was still in the house.

The bracelet, which was pawned by Adamson, has since been recovered.

Recorder Francis Abbott told him: “It is a pretty mean offence. You have done it out of spite.

“You just thought you would do this because of the break-up of your relationship.”

Adamson was handed a 12-month community order with a three-month curfew. He must remain at home every night between 9pm and 5am.

Adamson, who is working part-time as a gardener, must also pay £50 victim surcharge.

Ex-partner Jade Willis had told the court that Adamson had bought the bracelet for her during their “on and off” three-year relationship.

She added that charms bought by herself, Adamson, and others had since been added to the bracelet, which she thought was worth £1,500.

Miss Willis said she had left the bracelet in her jacket, which went missing after Adamson left the house.

The court heard she was contacted a month later by someone who had seen its photograph on a shop’s website.

Nick Lewin, for Adamson, said he had pawned rather than sold the bracelet so that it could be recovered.

Plymouth Herald

SA1SA2

You can read about his other conviction here