Archive

Tag Archives: Plymouth

A pervert jailed for a decade for sexually abusing underage girls has been handed more time behind bars for writing a letter to one of his victims.

Dale Hewitt, aged 27, was branded a “low life scum” by the mum of one of the schoolgirls – who were driven to cut themselves or attempt suicide.

He was jailed last year for ten years for a string of sex offences, many committed after he plied his victims with drugs.

Hewitt, now at HMP Parkhurst on the Isle of Wight, wrote a letter which was delivered to the home of one of the girls a month after he was sentenced.

He appeared at Plymouth Crown Court via videolink to admit breaching the order banning him from contacting the girl.

James Targhidissian, for the Crown Prosecution Service, said she received a letter addressed to someone else, but clearly in Hewitt’s handwriting and directed at her, in August last year.

He added she told police she “went as white as a ghost”.

Mr Targhidissian said the letter was not threatening, enquiring about her and speaking about life in prison.

He added she went on holiday but handed the letter back upon her return.

Ali Rafati, for Hewitt, said: “He was not the person who sent the letter and did not authorise it.”

He asked why it had taken so long to bring the case to court.

Mr Rafati said that, with no response from the girl, Hewitt accepted he would not contact her “nor anyone else”.

Judge Paul Darlow said the letter had not been threatening and had not caused “serious psychological harm”.

He jailed Hewitt for three weeks, to be served at the end of his current sentence. Hewitt’s earliest release date is in four years.

Plymouth Crown Court heard last year that Hewitt slept with one schoolgirl and touched another indecently, often after giving them mephedrone and cannabis.

Hewitt handled weapons including a machete in front of the girls, then aged 13 and 14.

Manipulative Hewitt supplied both girls with mephedrone, or bubble, and sometimes cannabis before touching them sexually. He never asked for any money.

One girl told the jury through her recorded police interview that she was “wrecked” on drugs and alcohol, but Hewitt still had sex with her at his old flat in Clifton Place, Greenbank.

He later abducted a third girl aged 14, whom police found in the shower at his flat. The girl came to his home willingly, but Hewitt was under a duty to call the authorities.

Hewitt, previously of Marlborough Street, Devonport, changed his pleas during a trial to admit four counts of penetrative sexual activity with a child between December 2014 and February 2015.

He also admitted four counts of sexual activity with the other girl between April and December 2014.

Hewitt pleaded guilty to abducting the third teenager in February last year.

Hewitt was involved in a war of words with a weapon-loving thug who went on to murder innocent New Year’s Eve reveller Tanis Bhandari.

Hewitt traded threats with Donald Pemberton on Facebook – one of several men who helped provoke the random violence that night.

The jury in Hewitt’s trial were not told of his part in the night of terror which led to the murder of the 27-year-old builder in Tamerton Foliot on New Year’s Day, 2015.

Pemberton, then aged 21, and co-defendant Ryan Williams, then aged 22, were jailed for life just under 12 months later for the joint murder of Mr Bhandari.

Plymouth Herald

Advertisements
Stefan Adamson, wearing a David Cameron mask, attending a previous court hearing

Stefan Adamson, wearing a David Cameron mask, attending a previous court hearing

A MAN has been found guilty of stealing a charm bracelet worth £1,500 in what a judge called a “mean offence”.

Stefan Adamson, aged 26, had denied the theft of the Pandora bracelet but was found guilty by a jury after a trial at Plymouth Crown Court.

He snatched the bracelet as he walked out of the woman’s home at the end of their relationship on December 17 last year.

Adamson, of Rougemont Gardens, Eggbuckland, admitted taking the piece of jewellery but denied dishonesty.

He claimed he was going to use the bracelet as a “bargaining toll” to force his ex-partner to return his property which he claimed was still in the house.

The bracelet, which was pawned by Adamson, has since been recovered.

Recorder Francis Abbott told him: “It is a pretty mean offence. You have done it out of spite.

“You just thought you would do this because of the break-up of your relationship.”

Adamson was handed a 12-month community order with a three-month curfew. He must remain at home every night between 9pm and 5am.

Adamson, who is working part-time as a gardener, must also pay £50 victim surcharge.

Ex-partner Jade Willis had told the court that Adamson had bought the bracelet for her during their “on and off” three-year relationship.

She added that charms bought by herself, Adamson, and others had since been added to the bracelet, which she thought was worth £1,500.

Miss Willis said she had left the bracelet in her jacket, which went missing after Adamson left the house.

The court heard she was contacted a month later by someone who had seen its photograph on a shop’s website.

Nick Lewin, for Adamson, said he had pawned rather than sold the bracelet so that it could be recovered.

Plymouth Herald

SA1SA2

You can read about his other conviction here

A PAIR of women have been warned they may face jail after admitting involvement in a religiously-motivated assault on a Kurdish woman at a city centre takeaway.

Hayley Wells, 28, and Kelly Watterson, 30, were charged in relation to an attack on Sawda Kurdo at Istanbul Kebab in Exeter Street on August 31, 2011. The pair were due to stand trial, but changed their pleas to guilty at Plymouth Crown Court today.

  1. Hayley Wells, 28, and Kelly Watterson, 30, were charged in relation to an attack on Sawda Kurdo at Istanbul Kebab in Exeter Street

    Hayley Wells, 28, and Kelly Watterson, 30, were charged in relation to an attack on Sawda Kurdo at Istanbul Kebab in Exeter Street

Watterson, of St Peter’s Road, Manadon, admitted one count of affray and Wells, of Shell Close, Leigham, admitted one count of religiously aggravated common assault.

The prosecution offered no evidence in relation to the charge of affray against Wells and religiously aggravated assault against Watterson.

They were released on bail and ordered not to go within 100 metres of the kebab shop.

Recorder Jonathan Barnes told the pair: “This is a serious case. In adjourning it, I make no promises about what the sentence will be. All options, including immediate custody, are on the table.”

The Herald previously reported that Wells and Watterson were among a group drinking in the Wild Coyote pub near the kebab shop on the night of the incident. A court was told that the Kurdish family inside the kebab shop were subjected to racist abuse by a group shouting ‘EDL’.

Watterson was alleged to have thrown a glass into the shop which shattered.

Last year Michael Rafferty, 34 and formerly from Devonport, was convicted of resisting a police officer during the “large scale disorder” which involved about 30 people.

Wells and Watterson will be sentenced on February 22.

This is Plymouth

A MOTHER put hi-tech computers which did not exist for sale on eBay and then pocketed the cash, Plymouth magistrates heard.

Hayley Wells, aged 26, tried to raise cash by selling iPads over the internet auction website but never sent the customers any machines.

Wells, of Shell Close, Leigham, admitted two counts of fraud by false representation on September 13 and 24 last year.

Sandra Walsingham, for the Crown Prosecution Service, said Wells advertised an iPad for sale on eBay and a man transferred £425 for it into her account.

Wells sent the buyer a message saying the iPad was on its way, but it never arrived. EBay’s history was investigated and it was found that £365 was paid to Wells for another iPad.

Paul Brookman, for Wells, said she had just split up from a long-term partner, moved into a new rented home and needed money for work on the property.

He said that she left her personal details with the buyers adding: “It is difficult to see how she ever thought that she was going to get away with it.”

Mr Brookman said that she pleaded guilty immediately to what was her first offence.

She was given a conditional discharge for two years and ordered to pay full compensation for the amount she received.


This is Plymouth

A MAN shouted that a passing group of black teenagers were ‘looters’ in the wake of the riots last summer, a court heard.

Stefan Adamson, aged 24, then grabbed a 14-year-old boy and shook him by the straps of his rucksack in the city centre, Plymouth Magistrates’ Court was told.

adamson

Adamson told the group of six, who were all black save one who was from a Turkish background, that they were ‘rioters’ and ‘looters’ following the violence that tore through Britain.

Adamson, of Old Woodlands Road, Crownhill, denied racially-aggravated common assault and racially-aggravated threatening behaviour on August 12.

But he was found guilty of both offences after a trial. Sarah Vince, opening for the Crown Prosecution Service, said: “He singled out a group of black teenagers and taunted them in the street simply because of the colour of their skins.”The boy, now aged 15, told the court he had been walking down Armada Way towards the Hoe with five friends on the afternoon of August 12.He said as they passed the outside seating area of The Berkeley, formerly Bar Ha Ha, a tall man with a prominent tattoo on his neck shouted that they were ‘rioters’ and ‘looters’.The boy, who cannot be named for legal reasons, said the group walked by, but then returned to ask the man – Adamson – why he had called them names.He said Adamson accused them of ‘coming to our country’ and ‘taking our jobs’.

The boy said: “He started pulling the straps of my rucksack, he started shaking me and pulling me around.”

Adamson, who is 6ft 3ins tall, admitted in evidence to referring to the group as ‘looters’ and ‘rioters’.

But he said the comment was made to a friend and was a joke.

Adamson denied making any further comments and said he ‘did not lay a finger’ on the youth.

District judge William Tait said he was guilty of ‘offensive behaviour’ by insulting the group because of their appearance.

He added: “You showed hostility to the group simply because you perceived them not to be British.”

Mr Tait gave him a 12-month community order with 80 hours unpaid work. He was ordered to pay £25 compensation to the boy and £300 in prosecution costs.

The court heard that Adamson is already doing unpaid work on a community order imposed in November, when he admitted sending an offensive message by a public communication network.

Adamson, who had turned up at court wearing a David Cameron mask, urged internet users to ‘Bomb The Herald offices’.